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3 Common Fears Executives Face and How to Beat Them!

Updated: Sep 22, 2022


Fears you can Master to be an Effective Leader.

You can face and overcome any common worries that executives typically encounter in the workplace. Executive coaching can help you be confident while making decisions and taking action.


Corporate executives have worked hard to earn their position and they certainly deserve respect for everything they’ve put into the job, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t experience fear like the rest of us!


Executives are human, too, and when it comes time to take a risk they can be held back by the same fears and hesitations we all feel.

Entrepreneurship requires effective leadership from each one. The skills of being able to make solid decisions, organise business plans, hire the right teammates and provide direction – all must be executed seamlessly even if under steady pressure. As we conclude on August theme " Emotional intelligence" , let’s take a look at some of the most common fears Executives deal with and steps you can take to overcome those fears.


COMMON FEARS EXECUTIVES FACE

Fear #1: Poor Decision-Making

With big responsibilities come big potential consequences and for many executives, poor decision-making can have serious repercussions – including the risk of losing your job! People look to executives to make thoughtful, wise and sound choices when it comes to the leadership of the company.

However, if you become so caught up in the potential downsides of making a big decision that you’re paralyzed and don’t take any action, that can be much worse than taking a risk and trying something different!

It’s a difficult line to walk, but a strong leader will go look at all the information and ultimately go with his or her gut.


Fear #2: Appearing Vulnerable or Weak

The corporate world can be ruthless and many executives are afraid of appearing weak or vulnerable in front of power-hungry colleagues. However, it’s important not to fall into the trap of disconnecting emotionally from your team members; you’re not a robot, and your team will function better if everyone has some sort of human connection to you and to each other.

I knew an executive who was great at her job. She earned a six-figure income, she worked in the C-Suite, and she was well respected at her company. It wasn’t until one of her colleagues jokingly called her a “robot” that she realized something might be off.

She did some self-reflection and realized that she thought if she showed any kind of vulnerability she wouldn’t be trusted or looked up to. Therefore, at work, she never talked about anything personal. Her co-workers knew nothing about her life outside of work, her hobbies or her tastes. They only knew her as, well, a robot.

Once she started opening up and creating positive relationships at work with the people around her, things improved at the office. She actually became more respected, trusted and looked up to when she let people see a more authentic side of herself.


Fear #3: The Imposter Syndrome

Many successful people secretly worry that they made it to their position by a fluke or accident. No matter how hard they’ve worked or how many years they’ve put into their job, there’s some part of them that believes, deep down, that they don’t deserve to be there. On some level, they’re worried others will find out that they’re imposters.

This feeling has been well documented by psychologists in the New York Times Oct 26, 2015 article titled Learning to Deal With the Impostor Syndrome. However, the good news is that it is certainly manageable. Simply becoming aware that you feel that way can help you better manage the decision-making process in the workplace.

Ultimately, if you feel the Imposter Syndrome, it’s important to make sure that you do not allow it to interfere with making the right decisions for your organization.


Executives Must Walk the Fine Line Socially

For executives, it really is a matter of walking a fine line and being socially and emotionally aware of what is going on around you in the office place. Making good decisions but still being willing to take a risk, feeling confident in yourself, and connecting with the people around you are all important aspects to gaining and maintaining the respect you deserve.

Corporate executives who have worked hard to earn their position certainly deserve respect for everything they’ve put into the job, but that doesn’t mean that they don’t experience fear like the rest of us. Executives are human, too, and when it comes time to take a risk they can be held back by the same fears and hesitations we all feel.


 

If you would like to be helped working on any of these fears so you can excel in the workplace, let’s talk. Consider my Executive coaching program or email back so that we get you started.


Have a wonderful September full of freshness and success.

Coach Alice.

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